How to Adjust the Size of Images

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In this article, you will learn:

  1. Resizing Images with “Block Layouts”
  2. Using “Column Widths feature” for smaller images
  3. Acceptable file types / sizes
  4. Compressing an Image/GIF

 

Resizing Images with “Block Layouts”

A Block is a structure for your content. Elements live inside of Blocks.
Elements live inside those columns and make up the content (Images, Text, Surveys).

 

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Example of a 1-column Block layout

 

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Example of a 3-column Block layout

Every Element stretches to the full width of each column (with some optional padding).
In order to make an image smaller, you have to use a block layout with smaller columns (like the 3-column block layout above).

You can achieve many different sizes by experimenting with different Block layouts:

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Here we’ve created a smaller image that’s ⅓ the size by using a 3-column Block layout.

01_Small-Image-v2.gif

 

You can then use “Spacer” elements to create negative space. Here, we’ve changed the color from grey to white.

02_Spacers.gif

Using “Column Widths feature” for smaller images


If you want to make your image even smaller, make sure to click the sides of the Block (not the Image) to show the Block Settings on the right. Adjust the sliders on the “Column Widths” feature.

03_ColumnWidths.gif

 

On Mobile devices, all the columns will stack vertically and stretch to the full width of the mobile device. If you really need the image to be smaller on mobile, consider using a 1 column block, and adding white or transparent side borders to it in another photo editing program before uploading it to Bananatag (see example below).

MobileSmall.png

 

Acceptable file types / sizes

We accept png, jpeg (.jpg), and GIF formats only. 

The maximum file size for one image is 10MB.

The maximum file size for GIFS is .5 MB, for optimal playback speed.

Warning: Older versions of Outlook will not render GIFs. GIFs will display if your recipients have the Outlook Desktop for the Microsoft Office 365 subscription, Outlook Web App (OWA), and the Outlook Mobile App.

 

Compressing an Image/GIF

If your email is too large, Gmail will clip your messages. The images may also take longer to load if your recipient has a slow internet connection, which can affect read-times. 

 

For Windows, you can use MS-Paint. Click the "Resize" button on the ribbon. When the "Resize and Skew" window opens, make sure the "Maintain aspect ratio" box is checked.

Resize_Image.gif

 

For Mac, you can use Preview. In the menu, click “Tools” → “Adjust Size,” and enter a smaller width/height. Make sure that “Scale proportionally” and “Resample Image” are checked.

 

05_Compress-on-Mac.gif

 

Compressing a GIF (for .5 MB limit)

Add a GIF by clicking the “Upload New Image” button. Much like still images, GIFs need to be small, for optimal loading times. 

 

For Windows, you can use the same method above in MS Paint. Click the "Resize" button on the ribbon. When the "Resize and Skew" window opens, make sure the "Maintain aspect ratio" box is checked.

 

For Mac, you can also use the same method above by opening up the GIF with Preview. Use “Command + A” to select all the thumbnails. In the menu, click “Tools” → “Adjust Size,” and enter a smaller width/height. Make sure that “Scale proportionally” and “Resample Image” are checked.


 

 

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